Being sane in insane places

Mandos permalink July 1, I think that if people knew the numbers, they would understand they were being conned, by their leaders, by the media, and above all by the insurance industry. I do not share your confidence that people, when confronted with the evidence that they are being conned at such a scale, would react the way you seem to think that they would react.

Being sane in insane places

Pseudopatient experiment[ edit ] Rosenhan himself and seven mentally healthy associates, called "pseudopatients," attempted to gain admission to psychiatric hospitals by calling for an appointment and feigning auditory hallucinations.

The hospital staff were not informed of the experiment. The pseudopatients included a psychology graduate student in his twenties, three psychologists, a pediatrician, a psychiatrist, a painter, and a housewife.

The horizon is not so far as we can see, but as far as we can imagine

None had a history of mental illness. Pseudopatients used pseudonyms, and those who worked in the mental health field were given false jobs in a different sector to avoid invoking any special treatment or scrutiny.

Apart from giving false names and employment details, further biographical details were truthfully reported. During their initial psychiatric assessmentthe pseudopatients claimed to be hearing voices of the same sex as the patient which were often unclear, but which seemed to pronounce the words "empty," "hollow," "thud," and nothing else.

These words were chosen as they vaguely suggest some sort of existential crisis and for the lack of any published literature referencing them Being sane in insane places psychotic symptoms.

No other psychiatric symptoms were claimed. If admitted, the pseudopatients were instructed to "act normally," reporting that they felt fine and no longer heard voices.

Hospital records obtained after the experiment indicate that all pseudopatients were characterized as friendly and cooperative by staff. All were admitted, to 12 psychiatric hospitals across the United States, including rundown and underfunded public hospitals in rural areas, urban university-run hospitals with excellent reputations, and one expensive private hospital.

Though presented with identical symptoms, seven were diagnosed with schizophrenia at public hospitals, and one with manic-depressive psychosisa more optimistic diagnosis with better clinical outcomes, at the private hospital.

Their stays ranged from 7 to 52 days, and the average was 19 days. All were discharged with a diagnosis of schizophrenia "in remission," which Rosenhan considered as evidence that mental illness is perceived as an irreversible condition creating a lifelong stigma rather than a curable illness.

Despite constantly and openly taking extensive notes on the behavior of the staff and other patients, none of the pseudopatients were identified as impostors by the hospital staff, although many of the other psychiatric patients seemed to be able to correctly identify them as impostors.

In the first three hospitalizations, 35 of the total of patients expressed a suspicion that the pseudopatients were sane, with some suggesting that the patients were researchers or journalists investigating the hospital. For example, one nurse labeled the note-taking of one pseudopatient as "writing behavior" and considered it pathological.

The experiment required the pseudopatients to get out of the hospital on their own by getting the hospital to release them, though a lawyer was retained to be on call for emergencies when it became clear that the pseudopatients would not ever be voluntarily released on short notice.

Once admitted and diagnosed, the pseudopatients were not able to obtain their release until they agreed with the psychiatrists that they were mentally ill and began taking antipsychotic medications, which they flushed down the toilet.

Being sane in insane places

No staff member noticed that the pseudopatients were flushing their medication down the toilets and did not report patients doing this. Rosenhan and the other pseudopatients reported an overwhelming sense of dehumanizationsevere invasion of privacy, and boredom while hospitalized.

Their possessions were searched randomly, and they were sometimes observed while using the toilet. They reported that though the staff seemed to be well-meaning, they generally objectified and dehumanized the patients, often discussing patients at length in their presence as though they were not there, and avoiding direct interaction with patients except as strictly necessary to perform official duties.

Some attendants were prone to verbal and physical abuse of patients when other staff were not present. A group of bored patients waiting outside the cafeteria for lunch early were said by a doctor to his students to be experiencing "oral-acquisitive" psychiatric symptoms.

Contact with doctors averaged 6. I told friends, I told my family: They had said I was insane, "I am insane; but I am getting better. Rosenhan arranged with them that during a three-month period, one or more pseudopatients would attempt to gain admission and the staff would rate every incoming patient as to the likelihood they were an impostor.

Out of patients, 41 were considered to be impostors and a further 42 were considered suspect. In reality, Rosenhan had sent no pseudopatients; all patients suspected as impostors by the hospital staff were ordinary patients.

This led to a conclusion that "any diagnostic process that lends itself too readily to massive errors of this sort cannot be a very reliable one".Rosenhan, D.L. () On being sane in insane places Background. There is a long history of attempting to classify what is abnormal behaviour.

The most commonly accepted approach to understanding and classifying abnormal behaviour is .

Being sane in insane places

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In his essay, On Being Sane in Insane Places, D. L. Rosenhan discusses a series of experiments that he participated in involving psychiatric institutions and the effect of misdiagnoses of psychological disorders on the patients admitted to the hospitals.

Rosenhan’s research shows us that the labels associated with mental illness . Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Insane: America's Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness at ashio-midori.com Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.

(PLEASE CHECK THE BYLINE ABOVE. YES, IT’S MANDOS AGAIN.) Single-payer is proposed by many as the most ideal way to reform the payment/insurance process for health care in the US, for reasons with which I mostly agree, based on personal experience.

D. L. Rosenhan's On Being Sane in Insane Places: Summary & Analysis - SchoolWorkHelper